Resistance Training Reduces Injury in Youth Athletes

In our last article, we discussed the safety of youth resistance training. In addition to being safe for youth athletes, resistance training can also reduce injury and improve athletic performance. Resistance training has been shown to reduce injuries in adolescents who participate in football, soccer, basketball, and various other sports1-2. Adolescent females are especially vulnerable to knee injuries. Preseason conditioning programs that include plyometric training, resistance training, and jump training significantly reduce knee injuries in female athletes. Also, youth athletes who engage in regular resistance training recover quicker from injuries when they do occur.

When to Incorporate Resistance Training for Children

Youth athletes can benefit from developing fundamental movement skills (e.g., jumping, landing, and throwing) through appropriate fitness conditioning at early ages (6-10 years old). Once fundamental movement skills are mastered, appropriately supervised resistance training programs can be initiated to reduce the likelihood of overuse injuries occurring during sport. Resistance training addressing specific risk factors associated with youth-sport injuries (e.g., low fitness, muscle imbalances, and training errors) reduce overuse injuries by as much as 50%1, 3. With early exposure to resistance training, young athletes may be able to prevent the development of deficits which predispose them to injury later in life.

Resistance Training for Youth Non-Athletes

Free-time physical activity among children and adolescents is on the decline. Resistance training is beneficial for athletes and children who are not engaged in competitive sports. Physical inactivity is a risk factor for activity-related injuries in children. Youth who participate regularly in age-appropriate fitness programs, which include resistance training, may be less likely to suffer an injury.

Conclusion

Although the total elimination of injuries is unrealistic, appropriately designed conditioning programs that include resistance training can help reduce the likelihood of sports- related injuries.  Clearly, incorporating resistance training supervised by qualified professionals is in the best interest of any young athlete looking to minimize risk for injury and improve performance. Our next article will discuss the role of resistance training for improving athletic performance.

References

  1. Faigenbaum, A., Kraemer, W., Blimkie, C., Jeffreys, I., Micheli, L., Nitka, M., & Rowland, T. (2009). Youth resistance training: Updated position statement paper from the National Strength and Conditioning Association. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 23(5), S60–S79.
  2. Faigenbaum, A. D., & Myer, G. D. (2010). Resistance training among young athletes: safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 44, 56–63. http://doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2009.068098
  3. Lloyd, R. S., Faigenbaum, A. D., Stone, M. H., Oliver, J. L., Jeffreys, I., Moody, J. A., … Myer, G. D. (2014). Position statement on youth resistance training: The 2014 international consensus. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48, 498–505. http://doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2013-092952